This frightening fall reading list is powerfully spooky

All of these books and others are good reminders of just how important it is to keep our grid safe and make me thankful that our utilities take that responsibility seriously.

Key Points

  • Fall is a great time to get back into reading.
  • Some of Amazon’s top rated books are post-apocalyptic fiction that related to energy.
  • The thought of a countrywide power outage is scary, but thankfully, our utilities work hard to keep us safe. 

I’m part of a very serious book club.

We never get together to just sip wine and eat snacks. It could practically be credit for a grad school literature class.

OK, so maybe we exchange the occasional funny story and pop open a little bit of wine. …

Fine, truth police, you got me.

We only sit and chat, and I didn’t even read the last book but only because we chose the book on precisely the same day I discovered the show “This is Us” exists, and I only have 30 minutes tops for entertainment each night after I get the kids to bed, and I might have an actual addiction to that show, but give a girl a break! You don’t know my life!

Anyhoo, we’re currently deciding what book to take on next (which we will all read, cover to cover, promise).

Which made me think about some of the great power-related books out there.

No really.

Think about how a huge blackout can be the perfect backdrop to a post-apocalyptic fantasy. I’m not above reading a little teen fiction.

Here are a few books to check out the next time you curl up in a warm blanket with fuzzy socks and definitely do not even think about things like if Kate’s singing career will take off, when and how Jack is going to leave the scene, if Kevin is going to really end up with Isabelle, and how the heck Rebecca and Miguel ever became a thing.

  • “Outage” by Ellisa Barr — Chaos reigns after an electromagnetic pulse attack destroys the country’s power grid and sends the United States back to the Dark Ages. The official summary on Amazon questions if the story’s teen protagonist can ever survive without a cell phone. To which teens everywhere said, no, no she definitely cannot. Also, no heat or clean water might also be issues, but mainly, cell phones.
  • “Once upon an apocalypse by Jeff Motes — The United States is attacked with an electro-magnetic pulse weapon. In the twinkle of an eye, America is sent back deep into the 19th century. A single mom, bank vice-president and contractor journey home amid the chaos. Readers are advised to keep tissues close to hand.
  • “Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins – You can’t talk about post-apocalyptic fiction without mentioning “The Hunger Games.” In “Mockingjay,” Katniss and other district citizens begin to rebel against the capitol and President Snow. District 5 breaks a dam that provides hydroelectricity to the entire capitol, leaving the city without any power and highlighting the need for redundancy in our power grid.

All of these books and others are good reminders of just how important it is to keep our grid safe and make me thankful that our utilities take that responsibility seriously.

They have teams working to keep trees from taking down lines, engineers who make sure we have backup power when we need it, and computer whizzes fighting off cyber-attacks.

All of this takes investment, but I, for one, sleep a little better at night knowing that some of my utility bill goes towards these efforts each month.

Watching an episode of “This Is Us” right before nodding off helps too.


Sarah FolslandSarah is mom to the two cutest little girls in the world. Before choosing to make changing diapers and reading bed time stories her full time gig, she earned a degree in political science from The University of South Dakota, worked in the governor’s office as a policy analyst and dabbled in communications at her local utility. Follow Sarah on Twitter @EnergyMommy.

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